Pin-Outs of popular PLL Chips

There is no guarantee expressed or implied that the
information contained herein is correct.  Use at your own risk.  "Putting mo' axe in yo' co-ax since 1979!"  Information
provided here is just that: information.  If you use it to break the law, then YOU, indeed, have broken the law.


CCI3001

Fin 1 18 FIL
Vdd 2 17 FIL
RI 3 16 P0
RO 4 15 P1
Vss 5 14 P2
AO 6 13 P3
AI 7 12 P4
** 8 11 P5
PD 9 10 P6


* R=1, T=0. Shifts down 455 KHZ in Transmit mode.
** Control used to turn off the Mixer IC input between TX and RX.

Obsolete Chip using binary inputs and ROM.


CCI3002

NC 1 18 ***
Vss 2 17 **
VCO 3 16 Vss
VCO 4 15 Vdd
T/R* 5 14 P0
PD 6 13 P1
P5 7 12 P2
P4 8 11 P3
RI 9 10 RO

*R=1, T=0
**27 MHz out to TX amps.
***17 MHz out to RX Mixer.

Obsolete chip using binary inputs.  Unique in that it contains its own mixer for the VCO.


C5121

SEG-A 1 22 ****
SEG-B 2 21 NC
SEG-C 3 20 Setp***
SEG-D 4 19 CH. 9
SEG-E 5 18 T/R**
SEG-F 6 17 LD*
SEG-G 7 16 PD Out
SEG-H 8 15 AI
RI 9 14 AO
RO 10 13 Vdd
Vss 11 12 Fin


*1=Locked, 0=Unlocked
**1-TX, 0=RX
***1=Step Up, 0=Step Down
****LED Bar/Graph Multiplex Out

The latest AM/FM type chip, identical in mixing to the TC9109. Note this chip uses a single data bit to step up or step down, eliminating the expensive BCD type channel selector switch.  Like the SM5123A/SM5123B, this contains the LED drivers within the chip.

NOT easily modified.


HD42851
(Hitachi)

P1 1 24 MC (usually unconnected)
P2 2 23 Vss
P3 3 22 LD**
P4 4 21 PD Out
P5 5 20 AI
P6 6 19 AO
P7 7 18 PD in from Programmable Divider
P8 8 17 Reference Divider Out
1/2R 9 16 PD in from Reference Divider
RI 10 15 Programmable Divider Out
RO 11 14 FS
Vdd 12 13 Fin

*1=10 KHz Steps, 0=5 KHz Steps
**1=Locked, 0=Unlocked

An interesting chip that is easy to mistake for the mPD861 as the pinout is almost identical. With pin 14 LOW, N-codeis pure 8-bit binary with a range of N=53-308. With Pin 14 HIGH,range is N=3-191. If pin 14 is HIGH and pins 7 and 8 are LOW,programming is BCD with standard N-code of 91-135.  Many internal functions brought out to IC pins for easier troubleshooting.

Easy modification by changing the binary programming.


LC7110
(Sanyo)

Vdd 1 20 Vss
Fin 2 19 P1
RB 3 18 P2
RI 4 17 P3
RO 5 16 P4
** 6 15 P5
AO 7 14 P6
AI 8 13 P7
PD 9 12 P8
LD* 10 11 P9

1=Locked, 0=Unlocked
**Tied High

An obsolete chip with internal ROM and binary inputs. As used in most models, N=150 (CH.1) to 194 (CH.40).


LC7120
(Sanyo)

P1 1 20 Vss
P2 2 19 AO
P3 3 18 AI
P4 4 17 PD
P5 5 16 LD1
P6 6 15 LD2
IFS* 7 14 Fin
T/R** 8 13 1/2R
Vdd 9 12 RB
RI 10 11 RO

*1=10.695 MHz IF, 0=9.785 MHz IF
**R=1, T=0

One of the later BCD/ROM chips now finding its way into European rigs. The programming, IFS, and T/R pins use internal pull-down resistors.  Chip uses 5 KHz divider steps. LD1 is active LOW; LD2 is active HIGH.  Several N-Code sets are possible depending upon AM or SSB use and choice of IF, very similar to mPD2810. Examples for AM circuits: For 10.695 MHz IF, N-codes are 182 to 270 (RX) and 273 to 361 (TX); For 9.785 MHz IF, N-codes are 364-452 (RX) and 273 to 361 (TX).  Notice the 455 KHz may shift up or down on TX relative to whether the IF is operating above or below the 10.24 MHz mixing signal.  For SSB use, the T/R and R pins are not used; Instead a separate crystal oscillator provides the loop mixing.  Most SSB chassis using this chip or the mPD858 (and some with MC145106 or mPD2824) have identical main chassis; the PLL chip is the only difference and all are designed for  straight 91 to 135 N-code division.


LC 7113
(Sanyo)

Vdd 1 16 Vss
Fin 2 15 P1
1/2R 3 14 P2
RI 4 13 P3
RO 5 12 P4
FS** 6 11 P5
PD 7 10 P6
LD* 8 9 P7

*1=locked, 0=unlocked
**1=1024, 0=1152

An obsolete chip used in a very expensive rig.  Uses 7-bit binary programming with internal pull-down resistors.  Pin 9 presets the counter as follows: Pin 9 HIGH, 64 + N: Pin 9 LOW, 128 + N.  Mods: Only 19 high channels because of N!


LC7132
(Sanyo)

P1 1 20 T/R**
P2 2 19 Fin
P3 3 18 Vdd
P4 4 17 AO
P5 5 16 AI
P6 6 15 PD
P7 7 14 LD***
P8 8 13 Vss
CH9* 9 12 RO
Test 10 11 RI

*Ch 9 called up when HIGH
**R=1, T=0
***1=locked, 0=unlocked

Newer AM-only type chip, identical to the TC9109 and MB8733.  ROM Controlled with direct VCO division.  Note now it uses 8 program lines rather than 6, with the Ch.19 recall feature pin of the LC7130/31 series removed; only the Ch. 9 recall feature is retained.  Found mainly in the Korean-made Maxon chassis.

NOT modifiable by normal methods.  


LC7130/31 - US
LC7135 - EEC
LC7136/37 - UK
(Sanyo)

P1 1 20 T/R**
P2 2 19 Fin
P3 3 18 Vdd
P4 4 17 AO
P5 5 16 AI
P6 6 15 PD
Test 7 14 LD***
CH19* 8 13 Vss
CH9* 9 12 RO
MC 10 11 RI

 

*CH 9 and 19 called up when pins are HIGH.
**R=1, T=0
***1=locked, 0=unlocked

1. For LC7130, LD and MC are active HIGH; for LC7131/35/36/37, active LOW.
2. LC7131 and LC7137 can be interfaced to LC7181/LC7191 scanning system.
3. All chips use direct VCO division, ROM, 5 KHz steps and single 10.240 MHz crystal.
4. LC7135 contains only the first 22 FCC channels in ROM for European Specs.
5. Channel Input codes are all BCD.
6. US and UK differ only in ROM N-codes.

Impossible to Modify!


M58472P
(Mitsubishi)

P4 1 18 Vdd
P5 2 17 P3
P6 3 16 P2
Fin 4 15 P1
RI 5 14 ***
NC 6 13 NC
LD* 7 12 ****
** 8 11 PD
Vss 9 10 FIL

*1=unlocked, 0=locked
**Tied Low
***1 presets 147 + N, 0 presets 102 + N
****Tied High

Obsolete chip with binary inputs.  Reference Oscillator was 5.12 MHz.  Used 5 KHz internal dividers.

Easy modification by changing the loop mixing crystal.


M58473P
(Mitsubishi)

P4 1 18 Vdd
P5 2 17 P3
P6 3 16 P2
Fin 4 15 P1
RI 5 14 **
RO 6 13 PD
NC 7 12 **
LD* 8 11 PD
Vss 9 10 FIL

*1=unlocked, 0=locked
**1=147, 0=203 + N

Obsolete chip with binary inputs and code converter.

Easy modification by changing the loop mixing crystal.


MB8719
MB8734
(Fujitsu)

RCI (Ranger) Now Makes a clone of this chip called the RCI8719

AO-2 1 18 Vss
AI-2 2 17 Fin
AO-1 3 16 P1
AI-1 4 15 P2
PD 5 14 P3
LD* 6 13 P4
RI 7 12 P5
RO 8 11 P6
Vdd 9 10 **

*1=locked, 0=unlocked
**1=64 + N for use with the 11.125 MHz crystal, 0=128 + N for use with 11.3258 MHz crystal.  This function not present in MB8734. US Models Only.

Pin 10 preset function normally pulls up HIGH.  6-bit binary inputs.  Pull-up resistors used.

Used in the most popular Uniden chassis ever made.  Still in current use worldwide, where it's been adopted to provide 80 or 120 channels and FM.  All chassis very similar and FM/Loop Crystal PC boards often wired separately in the foreign models, or a pair of MC14008 binary
adders is used to preset the chip's N-codes, extending its range to cover 120 channels with one loop crystal. Easiest modification is by control of pin 10, or by adding new loop crystals. If MB8734 is used, it must be replaced by MB8719 first.


MC145106 (Motorola)
MC55106/116/126 (National)

RCI (Ranger) now makes a clone of this chip called the RCI145106

Vdd 1 18 Vss
Fin 2 17 P0
RI 3 16 P1
RO 4 15 P2
1/2R 5 14 P3
FS* 6 13 P4
PD 7 12 P5
LD** 8 11 P6
P8 9 10 P7

*1 = 10 KHz Steps, 0 = 5 Khz Steps
**1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked

The full pinout version of the Motorola series.  Uses simple 9-bit binary programming with internal pull-down resistors on those pins.  Foreign models often use two MC14008 binary adders to preset the program pins; this allows use of up to 120 channels with a standard 40-channel detent switch. Output of PD is negative-going; i.e., output is high level with low frequency input to Programmable Divider, and low level when input signal frequency is high.


MC14568 and MC14526
(Motorola)

MC14568 is a Phase Comparator and Programmable Binary Counter; MC14526 is a 4-bit N Programmable Counter only.  Both required to make up the 8-bit N-codes.

The weight of the pins is:

MC14586 MC14526
Pin 4 - 128 bit Pin 2 - 8 bit
Pin 5 - 64 bit Pin 14 - 4 bit
Pin 6 - 32 bit Pin 11 - 2 bit
Pin 7 - 16 bit Pin 5 - 1 bit

An example of an early PLL device that required several discrete chips to form the loop.
In the NDI chassis, these were replaced by a single NDC40013 chip.


MM55108
(National)

Vdd 1 18 Vss
Fin 2 17 P1
RI 3 16 P2
RO 4 15 P3
1/2R 5 14 T/R**
RB 6 13 P4
PD 7 12 P5
LD* 8 11 P6
P8 9 10 P7

* 1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked
**R=1, T=0

An early National chip that never gained popularity in the US.  Currently used in new UK FM rigs.
Uses 455 KHz T/R shift, but program address is simple binary for modification use, with internal pull-down resistors on these pins.  Negative-going PD output to VCO.


MSC42502P
(3301-201)

Fin 1 16 Vdd
P4 2 15 P5
P3 3 14 P6
P2 4 13 P7
P1 5 12 P8
NC 6 11 RO
PD 7 10 RI
LD* 8 9 Vss


* 1 = locked, 0 = Unlocked

An early chip custom-made for the E. F. Johnson Company.  Uses BCD inputs and internal pull-up resistors on the programming pins.  The reference oscillator was always 5.12 MHz in this device.

Modification by changing the BCD programming.


MSM5807
(OKI Semiconductor)

P5 1 16 Vdd
P6 2 15 P4
P7 3 14 P3
P8 4 13 P2
FS** 5 12 P1
RI 6 11 Fin
RO 7 10 LD*
Vss 8 9 PD

*1 = Unlocked, 0 = Locked
**1 = 512, 0 = 1024

An obsolete chip.
Programming is binary with pull-down resistors on the pins.


MSM5907
(OKI Semiconductor)

P4 1 16 Vdd
P5 2 15 P3
P6 3 14 P2
P7 4 13 P1
P8 5 12 *
* 6 11 Fin
  7 10  
Vss 8 9  

*Tied LOW

A very early device, this is a Phase Comparator Divider only.  Used in conjunction with the MSL2301 Presettable Divider, in a manner similar to the MC14586/MC14526 loop where several discrete devices were needed.  Binary inputs are used.  The signal that drives the VCO comes from the MSL2301.


NIS7261A
(Suwa Seiko)

Vdd 1 16 P0
Fin 2 15 P1
PD 3 14 P2
LD* 4 13 P3
NC 5 12 P4
RO 6 11 P5
RI 7 10 P6
Vss 8 9 P7

*1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked

Both this chip and the NIS7264B are identical except for the Reference Oscillator crystals. This one uses 10.24 MHz.  Programming is binary. Chip is obsolete.


NIS7264B
(Suwa Seiko)

Vdd 1 16 P0
Fin 2 15 P1
PD 3 14 P2
LD* 4 13 P3
NC 5 12 P4
RO 6 11 P5
RI 7 10 P6
Vss 8 9 P7

*1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked

Uses 11.52 MHz reference crystal.  Programming is binary.  Chip is obsolete.


PLL01A
(NPC)

Vdd 1 16 P0
Fin 2 15 P1
RI 3 14 P2
NC 4 13 P3
PD Out 5 12 P4
PD In 6 11 P5
* 7 10 P6
P8 8 9 P7

*Output of Programmable Divider to PD

An early predecessor to the PLL02A, before the chip technology got faster and more sophisticated.  Programming is straight 8-bit binary.  Reference Oscillator was 6.40 MHz due to slower speed of dividers.  Used in a few old Cybernet chassis, such as PTBM027AOX and PTBM029AOX.


PLL02A (NPC)
MC145109 (Motorola)
AN/MN6040 (Panasonic)
SM5109 (NPC)
TC9100P (Toshiba)
ECG1233 (Sylvania)

Vdd 1 16 Vss
Fin 2 15 P0
RI 3 14 P1
FS* 4 13 P2
PD 5 12 P3
LD** 6 11 P4
P8 7 10 P5
P7 8 9 P6

*1 = 10 KHz steps, 0 = 5 KHz steps
**1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked

The most popular chip ever made.  Still in worldwide use today.  Chip is found in the Cybernet chassis.  A member of the Motorola family, it uses straight binary programming with internal pull-down resistors and a negative-going PD output.  Modification for additional channels is a simple matter of changing the programming or the loop mixing crystal(s).  The chip is widely used in the 18-channel Australian rigs, where the only real difference is in the Channel Selector switch.


PLL03A - US
PLL08A - EEC
(NPC)

Vdd 1 16 Vss
RI 2 15 P0
LD1** 3 14 P1
LD2 4 13 P2
LD3 5 12 P3
PD 6 11 P4
T/R* 7 10 P5
Fin 8 9 P6

*T=1, R=0
**Three LDs present.
LD1 is active HIGH
LD2 is active LOW
LD3 not normally used.

First attempt to use ROM in this early generation chip.  Loop downmix was still required due to slow divider speed.  Binary inputs are converted by ROM to a divisor in the 1,200 range.  Internal pull-down resistors on the program pins.  The PLL08A has only the first 22 FCC channels stored in ROM for the European specs; otherwise both chips identical.  Not modifiable unless you disconnect the 10.240 MHz signal where it enters the Mixer, replacing it with an external oscillator of your own.

NOT worth the trouble!


REC86345

*** 1 18 FIL
Vdd 2 17 Vss
Fin 3 16 P0
RI 4 15 P1
RO 5 14 P2
FS** 6 13 P3
**** 7 12 P4
LD* 8 11 P5
P7 9 10 P6

* 1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked.
** 0 = 10 KHz steps, 1 = 5 KHz steps.
*** AFC: Helps bring loop into lock. It is connected to VCO circuit.
**** APC (Automatic Phase Control) switch.
PD output feeds through this switch to VCO after lock-up.

An early chip custom-made by Resdel, parent company of Fanon-Courier Corporation.  Used simple 8-bit binary programming with internal pull-down resistors on the pins.

Easy modification by changing the binary programming.


SM5104 (NPC)
MC145104 (Motorola)
MM55104 (National)
MN6040A (Panasonic)
ECG1255 (Sylvania)

Vdd 1 16 Vss
Fin 2 15 P0
RI 3 14 P1
RO 4 13 P2
FS* 5 12 P3
PD 6 11 P4
LD** 7 10 P5
P7 8 9 P6

* 1 = 10 KHz steps, 0 = 5 KHz steps.
** 1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked.

Another member of the motorola family, almost identical to the PLL02A with one less binary bit but an on-chip oscillator for the 10.240 MHz input.  Internal pull-down resistors on the program pins.  Negative-going PD output to the VCO.

Easy modification by changing programming.


SM5107 (NPC)
MC145107 (Motorola)
MM55107 (National)

Vdd 1 16 Vss
Fin 2 15 P0
RI 3 14 P1
1/2R 4 13 P2
FS* 5 12 P3
PD 6 11 P4
LD** 7 10 P5
P7 8 9 P6

* 1 = 10 KHz steps, 0 = 5 KHz steps.
** 1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked.

Another member of the Motorola family, but never very popular.  Similar to the PLL02A, this one also requires an external Reference Oscillator circuit. It has 8 bits of binary programming with internal pull-down resistors on the pins.  This one also includes provision for the 5.12 loop mixing output signal.  Negative going PD output to the VCO.

Modification by changing the binary programming.


SM5118
(NPC)

Vdd 1 18 Vss
Fin 2 17 P1
RI 3 16 P2
RO 4 15 P3
1/2R 5 14 P4
RB 6 13 P5
PD 7 12 P6
LD* 8 11 P7
NC 9 10 P8

*1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked

Almost identical to the MM55108, minus the T/R pin.

Easy modification by changing the binary programming.


SM5123A
SM5125B

Tied HIGH 1 24 Tied LOW
SEG-A 2 23 Step UP
SEG-B 3 22 Step DOWN
SEG-C 4 21 Channel 9
SEG-D 5 20 Channel 19
SEG-E 6 19 T/R**
SEG-F 7 18 LD*
SEG-G 8 17 PD
Vss 9 16 AI
RO 10 15 AO
RI 11 14 Vdd
VSB (gnd) 12 13 Fin

*1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked
**R=1, T=0 and Pins 20-23 only active when LOW

A newer ROM chip which is identical in operation to the TC9106.  The only real differences are the inclusion of Channel 9 and Channel 19 pins (like the LC7131), 7 programming bits instead of 8, and UP/DOWN step pins. The step pins are required here because they have eliminated the expensive channel selector switch.

NOT easily modified.


SM5124A

RI 1 18 Vss
RO 2 17 P7
Vdd 3 16 P6
LD* 4 15 P5
PD 5 14 P4
AI 6 13 P3
AO 7 12 P2
T/R** 8 11 P1
Fin 9 10 P0

*1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked
**T = 1, R = 0

A newer ROM chip like the TC9106. The big difference is that this circuit shifts the VCO from 16 MHz on RX, directly to 27 MHz on TX by switching different inductances across the VCO coil.  This saves the expense of one extra mixer stage.  A 27 MHz VCO is extremely difficult to decouple on TX, however, resulting in possible spurious FM of the carrier.  A VERY CHEAP DESIGN.

NOT modifiable.


TC5080P (Toshiba)
Substitute: ECG1207 (Sylvania)

P0 1 16 Vdd
P1 2 15  
P2 3 14  
P3 4 13  
P4 5 12  
P5 6 11  
P6 7 10 DO*
P7 8 9 Vss

*Divider Output to TC5081

A simple binary Programmable Divider, used along with the TC5081 Phase Comparator and the TC5082 Reference Oscillator and Divider.


TC9102
(Toshiba)

Vdd 1 18 Vss
Fin 2 17 ***
RI 3 16 P0
1/2R 4 15 P1
*** 5 14 P2
PD 6 13 P3
AI 7 12 P4
AO 8 11 P5
LD* 9 10 T/R**

*1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked
**T = 1, R = 0
***Tied LOW

Uses 5-bit binary programming with Programmable Divider preset to 91 + N in Receive mode and 182 + N in Transmit mode to produce 455 KHz T/R offset.  Standard 16 MHz VCO. Requires external 10.24 MHz Transistor oscillator.


TC9103
(Toshiba)

Vdd 1 18 Vss
RI 2 17 Fin
RO 3 16 ***
1/2R 4 15 P0
PD 5 14 P1
AI 6 13 P2
AO 7 12 P3
LD* 8 11 P4
T/R** 9 10 P5

*1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked
**T = 1, R = 0
***Tied LOW

Very similar to the TC9102, this chip also uses a 5-bit binary channel program with the Programmable Divider preset to 182 + N for Receive and 273 + N for Transmit to give the 455 KHz T/R offset.  Internal division is 5 KHz. Unlike the TC9102, this chip contains its own oscillator, with only the 10.240 MHz external crystal required.  Compare with the TC9106, TC9109 and TC9119 which are basically identical but use a ROM code converter to prevent modification.


TC9106 (US)
TC9119 (UK)
(Toshiba)

Vdd 1 18 Vss
RI 2 17 P7
CL*** 3 16 P6
LD* 4 15 P5
PD 5 14 P4
AI 6 13 P3
AO 7 12 P2
T/R* 8 11 P1
Fin 9 10 P0

*1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked
**T = 1, R = 0
***Tied to ground by a capacitor, which determines the time constant for LD pin.

The beginning of the impossible chips! Uses double-ROM set which protects against illegal programming and also allows compatibility with 8-bit rotary LED Channel Selector.  Chips use direct division of a 16 MHz VCO, 5 KHz steps, and the only difference between them is the ROM N-codes needed to divide down the different US/UK VCO frequencies.

Impossible to modify!


TC9109 (Toshiba)
MB8733 (Fujitsu)

Vdd 1 18 Vss
RI 2 17 P7
CL*** 3 16 P6
LD* 4 15 P5
PD 5 14 P4
AI 6 13 P3
AO 7 12 P2
T/R* 8 11 P1
Fin 9 10 P0

*1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked
**T = 1, R = 0
***Tied to ground by a capacitor, which determines the time constant for LD pin.

Very similar to the TC9106, the only difference is a special /2 circuit following the reference Divider output inside the chip.  The T/R count shifts up by 2,139 but then is divided in half, resulting in an output in the Transmit mode which can easily be doubled to provide the direct on-channel frequency.


PD858
(NEC)
Sub: ECG1254 (Sylvania)

LD* 1 24 (5)
PD(2) 2 23 Vss
AI 3 22 P9
AO 4 21 P8
PD(3) 5 20 P7
(1) 6 19 P6
FS(4) 7 18 P5
1/2R 8 17 P4
RI 9 16 P3
RO 10 15 P2
Fin 11 14 P1
Vdd 12 13 P0

*0 = Locked, 1 = Unlocked
(1) Reference Divider Output
(2) Output
(3) Input
(4) 1 = 10 Khz steps, 0 = 5 KHz steps
(5) Programmable Divider Output

Used in one of the most popular Uniden chassis ever made.  EASY TO MODIFY, and very broadbanded.  Uses BCD programming with a potential of 399 channels.  Program pins must be controlled externally with pull-down resistors.  More features in this chip than have ever been used.  Many internal chip functions are brought out to pins to make troubleshooting easier. No longer allowed in the new US rigs, this chip now being widely used in Europe (mostly by President) where an extra 40 or 80 channels and FM are added.


PD861
(NEC)
Sub: ECG1254 (Sylvania)

P1 1 24 (1)
P2 2 23 Vss
P3 3 22 LD*
P4 4 21 PD
P5 5 20 AI
P6 6 19 AO
P7 7 18 (5)
P8 8 17 (2)
1/2R 9 16 (3)
RI 10 15 (4)
RO 11 14 MS**
Vdd 12 13 Fin

* 1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked
** Mode Select: 1 = 40 Channel BCD/ROM,
0 = 8-bit binary (n of 3 to 255) using pins 1-8.
(1) Inhibit. Goes HIGH in BCD/ROM mode for non-legal program.
Disconnect if not disconnected already.
(2) Reference Divider output
(3) PD in from Reference Divider
(4) Programmable Divider Output
(5) PD in form Programmable Divider

Another versatile chip, not seen much today.  For rigs already in Binary mode, it is a simple matter to expand by changing the binary programming.  For the BCD/ROM rigs, ground pin 14 and you can use all programming bits (pins 1-8).  Many of the chip's internal functions brought out to pins, thus making troubleshooting easier.


PD2810
(NEC)

P1 1 24 Fin
P2 2 23 Vss
P3 3 22 FS***
P4 4 21 AO
P5 5 20 AI
P6 6 19 PD
P7 7 18 Vdd
T 8 17 LD****
Q 9 16 1/2R
IFS* 10 15 RB
T/R** 11 14 RI
Vdd 12 13 RO

* IF Select: 1 = 10.695 MHz, 0 = 9.785 MHz
** R = 1, T = 0
*** 1 = 10 KHz Steps, 0 = 5 KHz Steps
**** 1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked

A very versatile chip no longer seen in the US, but showing up in European rigs.  Uses 7-bit BCD/ROM programming with internal pull-down resistors on these and the IFS pins. Very similar in mixing concepts to the LC7120. Notice the 455 KHz may shift up OR down on TX relative to whether the IF is above or below the 10.24 MHz reference signal.  For SSB use, the T/R and R pins are not used; instead an actual crystal oscillator provides loop mixing.


PD2812
(NEC)

Vdd 1 22 RO
Fin 2 21 RI
M* 3 20 1/2R
PO 4 19 P8
DO 5 18 P7
AO 6 17 P6
AI 7 16 P5
PD 8 15 P4
LD** 9 14 P3
Vss 10 13 P2
I*** 11 12 P1

*Mode Select: 0 = Binary, 1 = 40 Channel BCD/ROM
** 1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked
***Inhibit. Goes LOW if illegal BCD code is present in the ROM mode.

Another versatile chip now extinct, this one allows a choice of binary (N = 3 to 255) or BCD/ROM (N = 182 to 226) programming, controlled by the level on Pin 3.  Program pins use internal pull-up resistors.


PD2814
(NEC)
HD42K53 (Hitachi)
KM5624

P1 1 22 Rin
P2 2 21 Vss
P3 3 20 FS***
P4 4 19 AO
P5 5 18 AI
P6 6 17 PD
T 7 16 Vdd
Q 8 15 LD**
T/R* 9 14 RB
1/2R 10 13 RI
Vdd 11 12 RO

* R = 1, T = 0
** 1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked
*** 1 = 10 KHz Steps, 0 = 5 KHz steps

Another versatile chip similar to the mPD2810.  Was originally intended for AM or SSB rigs, but to date has only been used for AM.  Uses 6-bit BCD/ROM programming with internal pull-down resistors.  Pull-up resistors used on the T/R and FS pins.  Australian rigs may use HD42856 which is identical but only has 18 channels stored in ROM.


PD2816 (NEC)

P1 1 22 Rin
P2 2 21 Vss
P3 3 20 FS***
P4 4 19 AO
P5 5 18 AI
P6 6 17 PD
T 7 16 TC****
Q 8 15 LD**
T/R* 9 14 RB
1/2R 10 13 RI
Vdd 11 12 RO

* R = 1, T = 0
** 1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked
*** 1 = 10 KHz steps, 0 = 5 KHz steps
**** TC is a second unbuffered LD normally just tied high.

Another versatile chip but quickly fading away in AM use for the more secure chips.  Uses 6-bit BCD/ROM programming with internal pull-up resistors on the T/R, FS, and programming pins.  With FS HIGH, divider uses 10 KHz steps with N-codes of 91 to 135.  With FS LOW, N-codes are 182 to 270 when T/R is 1, and 273 to 361 when T/R is 0, yielding the 455 KHz AM IF offset.  For SSB use, the T/R pin is not required.  Modify the SSB units by switching the state of the T/R pin: This will give 40 channels beginning 455 KHz below channel 1.


PD2824
(NEC)

P1 1 22 Rin
P2 2 21 Vss
P3 3 20 NC
P4 4 19 AO
P5 5 18 AI
P6 6 17 PD
T 7 16 TC**
Q 8 15 LD*
NC 9 14 RB
1/2R 10 13 RI
Vdd 11 12 RO

* 1 = Locked, 0 = Unlocked
** TC is a second unbuffered LD normally tied HIGH

This is a cheap version of the PD2816 and is pin for pin identical except that it doesn't have the T/R pin. The only N-codes are 91 to 135.